What to Consider When Migrating to Australia as a Working Holidaymaker

Are you thinking of spending a few years in Australia on a working vacation? The Land Down Under is a fascinating place to explore, but many prospective backpackers become daunted by the possibility of not being able to settle into a new culture and country. To help you alleviate these doubts, we put this handy guide together that is brimming with useful info on the country and the people that call it home. Here are 5 things you might not know about Australia:

  1. The Lingo

Australia has a very unique twist on the English language that other speakers may have a bit of trouble adjusting to. One of these peculiarities is their tendency to shorten words to two-syllables ending with a ‘y’ sound. So, for example, you’re more likely to hear people complaining about mozzies, inviting you to a barby or telling you it’s time for brekky rather than mosquitoes, barbeques or breakfast.

  1. You’re likely entitled to tax refunds as a working holidaymaker

Taxes are a boring subject for most people, but brushing up on your knowledge before embarking on your Australia adventure can save you a great deal of hassle down the line. Did you know that thousands of working holidaymakers in Australia are entitled to a tax refund every year? Or that if you don’t have a Tax Filing Number (TFN) when starting a new job in Australia, your employer is legally obligated to withhold 45% of your wages as tax, regardless of your salary?

Another thing to consider is that you might need to start a Superannuation pension fund even if you don’t intend to retire in Australia. If you’re over 18 and earn more than $450 per month, your employer must pay 9.5% of your earnings into a super fund on your behalf.

  1. 6 months on a farm or ranch for 3 years of residency

If you’re planning to spend a few years living and travelling across Australia, this might be of interest to you! In 2019, the Australian Government announced that working holidaymakers can now stay in Australia for three years if they complete at least six months of rural agricultural work.

  1. Australia is HUGE!

Ok, this one might be obvious, but there are quite a few things that people don’t consider when thinking about travelling around Australia. While the cities are very well-developed, the outback is largely underdeveloped, which means that you might have issues with getting a decent internet connection in the countryside. Also, you can go miles through the outback without seeing a filling station – and this is one place you do not want to run out of fuel!

If you’re planning on taking a trip to the outback to be mindful of the fact that you may not have any service on your phone.  It’s a good idea to bring a paper map to guide you if you run into any trouble. Ensure to pack food and water as you may not see a shop for a couple of miles out there. Actually, the most reliable way of getting around the island-continent is probably by air! The cheapest airlines for domestic flights are Tiger Airways and Virgin Australia. Like any major airline they have loads of deals so keep an eye out for these.

  1. Hard Rubbish Day

This is something that may be of value to you if you’re short on money.  On Hard Rubbish Day, Australians leave unwanted items like appliances and furniture outside their homes for people walking by to take.  You never know, you might find something useful.

Getting There

It’s important to remember that you can’t travel to Australia without a proper visa. There are different types of visas for Australia and one of the first things you will need to check is what visa type you need, which will depend on the length of your stay, the purpose of your visit and the country you come from. The easiest way to apply for an Australian working holiday visa is with All Immigration Services. Their experienced visa agents will review your personal circumstances and determine which visa type is most suitable for you. Why not give them a call today and get started on your next exciting adventure.